Category Archives: Media

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New school tops season’s wish list

Source: Benjamin Millar, Maribyrnong Weekly  Dec 5, 2012

A POP-UP school will return to Yarraville next Saturday as parents enter the next phase of their campaign for a return of a high school to the area.

Participants in the December 15 SKY High community event will film a video Christmas message to Education Minister Martin Dixon, who has refused to meet parents.
 
Children will decorate the pop-up schooland have their faces painted while parents discuss the renewed campaign for next year.

SKY High spokeswoman Janine Lloyd said the group would meet Education Department officials on December 21 to discuss an updated high school provision report for theSeddon, Kingsville, Yarraville area.

“This is the third time the department has undertaken a provision study for the SKY area, and SKY High has provided the same feedback on each occasion,” she said.SKY High is calling on families to create their own version of “All we want for Christmas is a local high school” and post it on YouTube.

The pop-up school will be in Railway Park on the eastern side of Yarraville railway station from 10am-1pm December 15.

SKY HIGH advocates hit rock bottom

SKY High advocates hit rock bottomSave

PARENTS pushing for a new high school in the Yarraville area say they have hit a brick wall with the current government.

The Seddon, Kingsville, Yarraville (SKY) High working group’s decade-long push for the return of a secondary school to the area has stalled since the Liberal government came to power two years ago.

Spokeswoman Janine Lloyd says: “There are now unexplainable delays on the part of both the Education Department and the minister’s office that are creating frustration among our group, and it’s increasingly difficult to tell our membership of over 1300 families to be patient.”

Ms Lloyd said the problem would only get worse as a forecast 50 per cent population increase in Maribyrnong created a gap in public education.

In 2010, the Department of Education commissioned a demographic report on the area, which is now being updated with this year’s figures. The report uses a range of data, including ABS population figures and the number of children coming through primary schools to determine the need for secondary education in the area.

But Ms Lloyd said SKY High had been left in the dark as to the next steps in the process. “It’s particularly frustrating, given that in August 2010 the previous government had organised stakeholder forums, identifying solutions to our education black hole, for presentation to the SKY community in early 2011 — one and a half years ago,” she said.

 

“Unfortunately, the group has seen few signs of progress since the current government was elected.” SKY High has written to Education Minister Martin Dixon seeking a meeting.

The group will be rallying for support by building a “pop-up school” in Yarraville on December 15.

Mr Dixon’s spokesman, Ashley Gardiner, said the department was still analysing the report.

“Representatives of SKY High will be invited to meet senior officers from the department when this work is finished.”

http://www.maribyrnongweekly.com.au/story/1057439/sky-high-advocates-hit-rock-bottom/?cs=1468

Public schools shortage

Public schools shortage

By CHARLENE MACAULAY
 
13th November 2012 12:57:52 PM

PARENTS in Seddon, Kingsville and Yarraville (SKY) prefer to send their kids to public high schools – but the area still doesn’t have its own.

Research undertaken by the SKY High Working Group has identified that secondary college yield in SKY is 40 per cent higher than the rest of Melbourne combined.

Secondary college yield is the percentage of children in an area who attend a public secondary college, as opposed to the percentage of children attending any secondary college.

“The SKY secondary college yield of 50 per cent demonstrates the strong commitment to public education in this area, especially when compared to the Melbourne metropolitan average of 36 per cent,” SKY High member Janine Lloyd said.

“SKY children do not have a local public secondary college; our nearest public college is at least five kilometres away, the furthest that any children in Melbourne have to travel to a public high school.”

Ms Lloyd said the strong support for public schools in the region began from primary school, with 71 per cent of primary school aged children attending a public primary school.

She said the SKY primary school yield was 30 per cent higher than the rest of Melbourne.

The SKY area used to be served by the Footscray Yarraville High School and a Catholic High School until the early 1990s, when they were shut down by the Kennett Government.

Recent SKY High research found four out of five of last year’s Grade 6 students in the area are now enrolled in a public high school.

Of the four public primary schools in the SKY area, two now have zoning restrictions, and a third manages rising enrolments by implementing a neighbourhood policy.

Ms Lloyd said SKY High was concerned that progress towards a new high school in the region had stalled since the Ballieu Government was elected almost two years ago.

“There are now unexplainable delays on the part of both the Education Department and the Minister’s office that are creating frustration amongst our group and it is increasingly difficult to tell our membership of over 1300 families to be patient,” she said.

“Families in the SKY neighbourhood are leaving due to the lack of a high school. The fracturing of our community is no longer acceptable.”

SKYHigh Working Group media release

8th November 2012

SKYHigh parents frustrated over stalled process for a new high school

The SKYHigh Working Group is concerned that progress towards a new high school in Melbourne’s inner west has stalled since the Liberal government was elected almost two years ago.

“There are now unexplainable delays on the part of both the Education Department and the Minister’s office that are creating frustration amongst our group and it is increasingly difficult to tell our  membership of over 1,300 families to be patient,” SKYHigh spokesperson Ms Janine Lloyd said.

“Families in the SKY neighbourhood are leaving due to the lack of a high school.  The fracturing of our community is no longer acceptable says Ms. Lloyd.

Parents of the Seddon, Kingsville, Yarraville (SKY) High Working Group have now been working towards increasing secondary college provision in Melbourne’s inner west for nearly 10 years.

Ms Lloyd says that “with the population forecast to increase by 50% in Maribyrnong, the need for local high school places is only going to grow. SKY parents are committed to public education to fill this gap.

She says that “the need for a high school in the SKY area is obvious. Our primary schools are zoned and bursting at the seams with over 2,000 children enrolled. Last year 78% of these children went on to a public secondary college and now must travel around 5 kilometres each day to get to school. Some 1,560 SKY children need a high school. It’s a no brainer that a high school is needed here.”

Ms Lloyd says that SKYHigh members have worked co-operatively with the Education Department for about five years and the current Education Ministers office for close to two years after the current government was elected in December 2010.

“It is particularly frustrating” says Ms Lloyd, “given that in August 2010 the previous  Government had organised stakeholder forums, identifying solutions to our education black hole, for presentation to the SKY community in early 2011 – 1 ½ years ago”.

“Unfortunately the group sees few signs of progress since the current government was elected,” says Ms Lloyd.

Parents of the SKYHigh Working Group have been working with the Department of Education since June 2011 to produce an updated high school provision report for the SKY area. SKYHigh representatives provided comments to the Department’s third report on 19 September – two months ago- but have yet to receive a response or advice on the next steps in the process.

SKYHigh has written to the Education Minister the Honourable Martin Dixon requesting a meeting to discuss moving the process for a new high school to the feasibility study stage. “Other areas such as Prahran have progressed to high school feasibility study stage, without a provision study, yet SKYHigh continues to experience delays,” says Ms Lloyd.

The SKYHigh Working Group will hold their next public meeting on Monday 12th November at 8pm at the Yarraville Club in Stephen St Yarraville. Please come along to participate in our plans for our Christmas high school campaign.

Stay tuned for the SKYHigh Christmas video message to Minister Dixon!

For further SKYHigh information, please see www.skyhigh.org.au or email info@skyhigh.org.au.

Media Enquiries:  Janine Lloyd m: 0424 646 595 e: davenene@optusnet.com.au

Media release 25 Oct 2012

 

SKYHigh Working Group media release 

25th October 2012

SKY Highest public school support

 

Analysis of the 2011 Census reveals that parents in Seddon, Kingsville and Yarraville (SKY) have the strongest support for public schools across Melbourne.  This is despite the area not having a local high school.

 

Research undertaken by the SKYHigh Working Group (WG) has identified that secondary college yield in SKY is 40% higher than the rest of Melbourne combined.  SKYHigh spokesperson Ms. Janine Lloyd says that “the SKY secondary college yield of 50% demonstrates the strong commitment to public education in this area, especially when compared to the Melbourne metropolitan^ average of 36%”.  She says that, “SKY children do not have a local public secondary college, our nearest public college is at least 5km away, the furthest that any children in Melbourne has to travel to a public high school”.

Inner city boom in housing

Inner-city boom in house approvals as fringe fades

Date:

Tim Colebatch Economics Editor

housing-wide

MORE than 10 per cent of new homes approved in Victoria in the past year will be built in the city of Melbourne, as developers switch gears to meet the demand for inner-city living.

The Bureau of Statistics reports that in the past two years approvals for new homes on Melbourne’s outer fringe have plunged 25 per cent. Yet approvals in inner Melbourne have almost doubled, almost entirely in the CBD, Docklands and Southbank.

In 2011-12, for the second year in a row, most approvals for new homes in Greater Melbourne were granted in established suburbs within 20 kilometres of the GPO. Of 37,885 approvals in the metropolitan area, 8639 were in the inner ring, 20,374 were roughly within 20 kilometres of the GPO, and 17,511 on the outer fringes.

The figures undercut the state government’s decision to take more land out of Melbourne’s green wedges for housing. They suggest that increasingly, developers themselves are redeveloping the city and established suburbs to meet demand from buyers.

Last year, Melbourne City Council – or the appeals body, the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal – approved 5166 new homes in the city, including 1915 in the CBD, 1712 in Southbank, and 640 in Docklands. That was more than the boom municipalities of Wyndham (south-west, 2835 new homes) and Casey (south-east, 2322) combined.

One in 28 homes approved in Australia was in the city of Melbourne. Of the $75 billion of building approvals nationwide, $4.5 billion or 6 per cent was on lord mayor Robert Doyle’s turf.

There are fears that supply is rushing ahead of demand, with a risk that apartments could remain unsold, or drive down prices across the inner city, or never be built. Similar fears in 2003-04, however, proved unfounded.

The trend to live closer in is not confined to the CBD. Six other inner or middle-suburban municipalities – Port Phillip, Stonnington, Monash, Boroondara, Yarra and Moreland – each approved more than 1000 new homes, mostly apartments and units.

Of the $7 billion of non-residential building approved in greater Melbourne, $3 billion was in the city centre. But Whitehorse council attracted $554 million of non-residential building, including the Box Hill hospital redevelopment.

On the outer fringes, buyers are going north. The biggest number of approvals last year was in Whittlesea shire, where 3260 homes were approved, mostly in booming suburbs such as South Morang and Mernda. The figures will add to pressure on the state government to extend the new South Morang rail line to Mernda.

Geelong is still booming, with 1897 new homes and $911 million of new building approved in 2011-12. Bendigo approved 1222 homes and Ballarat 985. Overall, metro Melbourne dominated, taking 79 per cent of the state’s new homes and 81 per cent of the total value of approvals.

Media Release 9 Aug 2012

logo

SKYHigh Working Group media release

9th August 2012

 

SKYHigh survey launch

The Seddon, Kingsville, Yarraville (SKY) High Working Group (WG) is launching a new survey of the community to determine the demand for a local high school.

SKYHigh WG is hoping to get as many families as possible to complete the survey to obtain an accurate view of how many families would attend a local high school.  The group has a membership of over 1,300 families and is calling on these families to complete the survey.

The survey focuses on the lack of a local high school in Melbourne’s inner west, with the objective being to understand what proportion of children would attend a local high school.

SKYHigh WG spokesperson Janine Lloyd says that “currently students from Seddon, Kingsville and Yarraville have to travel at least 5km to the nearest high school.  Our students are further from a public, co-educational high school than any other secondary student in Melbourne”.

Ms. Lloyd says that “we already have evidence of the need for public schooling in SKY“.  Currently four in five children from the local primary schools in Seddon, Kingsville and Yarraville attend a public high school despite the closest one being five kilometres away.

The previous SKYHigh WG survey found that 64% of families would definitely send their child to a local high school and 97% of SKY families would consider sending their child to a local high school.

This survey is timely as members of the Working Group are expecting to meet with Education Minister Mr. Martin Dixon in the next couple of months to discuss findings from the SKYHigh secondary college provision report.  The results from the survey will be presented to Minister Dixon to help demonstrate the strong support our parents have for public education in this area.

The survey will be distributed to local primary schools, kinders and child care centres and will also be available on the SKYHigh website and facebook.

SKYHigh WG will be holding an AGM at 8pm on Monday 27th August at the Yarraville Club in Stephen St Yarraville.   Ms Lloyd added, “please come along to hear an update on progress.  We are looking for new members to help with the next phase of our campaign”.

For further SKYHigh information, please see www.skyhigh.org.au or email info@skyhigh.org.au. Media Enquiries:  Janine Lloyd m: 0424 646 595 e: davenene@optusnet.com.au

Plan for a school of their own

Plan for a school of their own

By CHARLENE MACAULAY
31st July 2012 09:49:33 AM
THE SKYHigh Working Group is confident its need for more high school places will be recognised after the State Government expanded places at a Coburg high school.

The group, which is pushing for a high school within the Seddon, Kingsville and Yarraville (SKY) region, were buoyed by news that Coburg Senior High School would be extended to a year 7-12 high school after a lengthy campaign by a community group.

SKYHigh spokesperson Janine Lloyd said the announcement was fantastic news for the public education system.

“It is important that the State Government has acted on the obvious need to increase secondary college places so that children have a local high school to attend,” Ms Lloyd said.

The SKY area used to be served by the Footscray Yarraville High School and a Catholic High School until the early 1990s, when they were shut down by the Kennett Government.

Recent SKYHigh research found four out of five of last year’s Grade 6 students in the area are now enrolled in a public high school – despite the closest one being five kilometres away.

Of the four public primary schools in the SKY area, two now have zoning restrictions, and a third manages rising enrolments by implementing a neighbourhood policy.

The SKYHigh Working Group is considering a range of rallies and public outings to tie in with new population data that is due to come out in coming weeks to get the State Government moving on a new high school for the SKY area.

Hope running SKYHigh in Maribyrnong

HAVE YOUR SAY: Hope running SKYHigh in Maribyrnong

SKYHigh has been buoyed by the State Government’s pledge to expand a high school in an education black hole.

High School for Coburg, which had been campaigning for a secondary school, were elated last week after it was revealed Coburg Senior High would become a grade 7-12 school in 2015.

SKY High spokeswoman Janine Lloyd said it was a positive sign that the Government was acting on calls for children to attend local high schools.

The group has been lobbying for a new secondary school in Yarraville, Seddon or Kingsville after the closure of Footscray Yarraville High School in 1996.

>> Why does the west need a new secondary school? Tell us below.

Ms Lloyd said it was urgently needed because primary school enrolments had reached a record high of 2000 students this year.

“Local primary schools are zoned to local families only, yet they are still bursting at the seams,” Ms Lloyd said.

“When you do the maths, it’s easy to see, 2000 kids in our local primary schools with 78 per cent going to a public secondary college equals over 1500 kids needing a local secondary college.”

The group is in talks with the Education Department to update an official secondary education document that will indicate whether population statistics and projections support the push for a new high school.

SKYHigh will hold its AGM on August 27.

* For more information go to skyhigh.org.au